Stingray Powerboats
Driving Range

Boating Magazine

Stingray 200: It keeps going and going.

Stingray 200MS

Numbers don't lie. While running at wide open throttle, I looked down at our fuel-flow test gauge and saw a burn rate of 7.2 gph. At cruising speeds, the numbers hovered in the 3-to-4-gph range. That means an angler who takes the helm of the Stingray 200MS center console can stalk fish very far away and for a long time.

Powered with the optional 120-bhp MerCruiser 1.7L DTI diesel, the 200MS is intended for the boater who wants range and fuel economy over top-end speed. The boat tops out at 41.7 mph, about 3 mph slower than the Bayliner Trophy 1903 powered by a 125-hp Mercury carbureted two-stroke outboard ($25,495). But to get that top speed, the traditional two-stroke had to burn 14.8 gph. A diesel engine can also run close to WOT for extended periods of time, which is harmful to gas engines. Of course, you're paying a few grand more for the diesel and, unlike an outboard, you can't tilt a stern drive out of the water when docked.

Stingray mounts the 1.7L DTI amidships--rather than astern--for better weight distribution underway, and connects it to the Alpha stern drive with a jackshaft. Diesel power makes the 200MS a little sluggish out of the hole, but once on plane it handles like a sportboat. The main drawback is the 1.7L DTI's rough idle. It's like putting quarters in a vibrating bed. Once you throttle up, though, and find its sweet spot, all is smooth and quiet.

The 200MS has a 14-gallon livewell built into the transom, along with two stowage compartments that double as fishboxes. The hatches, made of starboard plastic, serve as bait cutting boards. The inwale racks hold two rods apiece, and there are four gunwale-mounted rodholders. The captain's chairs sit on the engine box, which has a snap-on pad aft to serve as a fish-fighting bench seat.

Unlike the Trophy 1903 or the Century 2000 ($25,164 with a 115-hp Yamaha outboard), the 200MS is not a pure fishboat. It has an integrated swim platform on the transom and an optional radar arch ($1,838) that serves as a towing tower for water sports. (The optional T-Top is $2,300).

Stingray builds the 200MS with a fiberglass grid stringer system. The hull and deck are joined with screws and sealant, and the seam is protected by a stainless-steel rubrail. The one-piece nonslip liner bails through scuppers in the sole at the transom. The scuppers lead overboard to the sides, rather than aft, so no water enters while backing down on a fish.

LAST WORD. The economy and reliability of a diesel in a small fishboat.

Pete McDonald
Boating Magazine

 
BOATING CERTIFIED TEST RESULTS
Stingray 200MS
SPEED
EFFICIENCY
OPERATION
rpm
 knots 
 mph 
 gph 
 naut.
mpg 
 stat.
mpg 
 n. mi.
range 
 s. mi.
range 
run
angle
sound
level
900
3.6
4.1
0.4
8.9
10.3
505
581
1
71
1200
4.6
5.3
0.5
9.2
10.6
522
601
1
73
1500
5.7
6.6
0.8
7.2
8.3
406
468
2
73
1800
6.7
7.7
1.4
4.8
5.5
271
312
4
78
2100
7.9
9.1
1.9
4.2
4.8
236
272
5
80
2400
11.1
12.8
2.6
4.3
4.9
243
279
5
81
2700
15.9
18.3
2.8
5.7
6.5
322
371
4
83
3000
21.1
24.3
3.0
7.0
8.1
399
459
3
84
3300
26.2
30.1
3.4
7.7
8.9
436
502
2
84
3600
28.0
32.2
3.8
7.4
8.5
418
480
2
87
3900
31.5
36.2
4.4
7.1
8.2
405
466
2
88
4200
33.9
39.0
5.3
6.4
7.4
363
417
2
90
4400
36.2
41.7
7.2
5.0
5.8
285
328
1
90



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